National Poetry Day - A haunting prophecy

To mark National Poetry Day organised by the Forward Arts Foundation, I thought I would share one of my favourite poems with you.

A haunting prophecy of tragedy to come, from Julius Caesar, Act 1, Scene 3.

A common slave--you know him well by sight--
Held up his left hand, which did flame and burn
Like twenty torches join'd, and yet his hand,
Not sensible of fire, remain'd unscorch'd.
Besides--I ha' not since put up my sword--
Against the Capitol I met a lion,
Who glared upon me, and went surly by,
Without annoying me: and there were drawn
Upon a heap a hundred ghastly women,
Transformed with their fear; who swore they saw
Men all in fire walk up and down the streets.
And yesterday the bird of night did sit
Even at noon-day upon the market-place,
Hooting and shrieking. When these prodigies
Do so conjointly meet, let not men say
'These are their reasons; they are natural;'
For, I believe, they are portentous things
Unto the climate that they point upon.

 

Why not share your favouite poem on Twitter using #poetrydayuk

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